Portland City Council Votes for Fluoride

portlandcitycouncil.JPGPhoto by William Hamilton Ross of The Oregonian

Not a gluten-free issue, but one that will affect everyone’s water in the city. Do you have a problem with this ruling? Do you think its overdue?

(Via The Oregonian)The Portland City Council voted 5-0 during a raucous public meeting on Wednesday to add fluoride to Portland’s drinking water.The vote follows a nearly seven-hour public meeting last week in which proponents and opponents traded statistics and made their best arguments for why Portland should or should not use fluoride to combat tooth decay.

 

Fluorite crystal in its raw state.                

This is the right thing to do, and I’m pleased to vote aye,” Commissioner Dan Saltzman said first, drawing boos from the crowd.Commissioner Amanda Fritz, a former nurse,  parted ways with colleagues and declined to say before Wednesday’s vote how she would come down. Before voting yes, she gave a lengthy speech noting that fluoride was not a silver bullet. “We cannot simply add fluoride and expect all children and adults to have cavity-free teeth,” Fritz said. “Clearly, more education is needed.

Future site of fluoridization?

Commissioner Randy Leonard, who pushed the effort, said “this is not an issue for the faint of heart.” He, too, voted yes, of course.

Commissioner Nick Fish, who missed much of the public testimony at last week’s meeting, said he was “proud” to vote aye.

Mayor Sam Adams was the final yes vote.

Adams ejected several members of the audience who heckled members of the City Council during Wednesday’s vote.

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One thought on “Portland City Council Votes for Fluoride

  1. Bridget Smith

    Nothing like working to stay pure on one hand while on the other hand have a poison shoved down the throat. WITHOUT PERMISSION! The People have a right to say what goes in our drinking water. It is a human right to have clean water. City Hall has violated the citizens’ civil rights by caving in to the fluoridation companies. It was used as rat poison in the 1930s. It makes people more docile. OH, that’s why they want it in our water. Let the People decide.

    Reply

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